Post 1: Twentieth Century Graphic Designers. Jake Dempsey

14. “Design is thinking made visual.” Saul Bass

26. “ Graphic design will save the world right after rock and roll does.” David CarsonImageImage

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Saul Bass (May 8, 1920 – April 25, 1996) was an American graphic designer and filmmaker, perhaps best known for his design of film postersand motion picture title sequences.

During his 40-year career Bass worked for some of Hollywood’s greatest filmmakers, including Alfred HitchcockOtto PremingerBilly Wilder,Stanley Kubrick and Martin Scorsese. Amongst his most famous title sequences are the animated paper cut-out of a heroin addict’s arm for Preminger’s The Man with the Golden Arm, the credits racing up and down what eventually becomes a high-angle shot of the C.I.T. Financial Building in Hitchcock’s North by Northwest, and the disjointed text that races together and apart in Psycho. Bass designed some of the most iconic corporate logos in North America, including the AT&T “bell” logo in 1969, as well as AT&T‘s “globe” logo in 1983 after the breakup of the Bell System. He also designed Continental Airlines‘ 1968 “jetstream” logo and United Airlines‘ 1974 “tulip” logo which became some of the most recognized airline industry logos of the era.

David Carson (born September 8, 1954) is an American graphic designerart director and surfer. He is best known for his innovative magazine design, and use of experimental typography. He was the art director for the magazine Ray Gun, in which he employed much of the typographic and layout style for which he is known. Carson was perhaps the most influential graphic designer of the 1990s. In particular, his widely imitated aesthetic defined the so-called “grunge typography” era.

Carson was hired by publisher Marvin Scott Jarrett to design Ray Gun, an alternative music and lifestyle magazine that debuted in 1992.

In one issue, he notoriously used Dingbat, a font containing only symbols, as the font for what he considered a rather dull interview with Bryan Ferry.[3] (However, the whole text was published in a legible font at the back of the same issue of Ray Gun, complete with a repeat of the asterisk motif).

Ray Gun made Carson well known and attracted new admirers to his work. In this period, he was featured in publications such as The New York Times (May 1994) and Newsweek (1996)In 1995, Carson left Ray Gun to found his own studio, David Carson Design, in New York City. He started to attract major clients from all over the United States. During the next three years (1995–1998), Carson was doing work for Pepsi ColaRay Ban (orbs project), NikeMicrosoftBudweiserGiorgio ArmaniNBCAmerican Airlines and Levi Strauss Jeans, and later worked for a variety of new clients, including AT&T CorporationBritish AirwaysKodakLycraPackard BellSonySuzukiToyotaWarner Bros.CNN, Cuervo Gold, Johnson AIDS FoundationMTV Global, Princo,Lotus SoftwareFox TVNissanquiksilverIntelMercedes-BenzMGM Studios and Nine Inch Nails. He, along with Tina Meyers, designed the “crowfiti” typeface used in the film The Crow: City of Angels.

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