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paula Scher (born October 6, 1948, Virginia) is an American graphic designer, illustrator, painter and art educator in design, and the first female principal at Pentagram, which she joined in 1991.

She is the 16th recipient of the School of Visual Art’s Masters Series Award and an exhibition of her work can be seen at the Visual Arts Museum & School of Visual Arts, which ties in with her book, Make it Bigger.

 

Paula Scher studied at the Tyler School of Art, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1970. Later on in life she moved to New York City and took her first job as a layout artist for Random House children’s book division.

 

in 1994, Paula Scher was the first designer to create a new identity and promotional graphics system for The Public Theater, a program that become the turning point of identity in designs that influence much of the graphic design created for theatrical promotion and for cultural institutions in general.

Based on the challenge to raise public awareness and attendance at the Public Theater along with trying to appeal to a more diverse crowd, Scher created a graphic language that reflected street typography and graffiti-like juxtapostion. In 1995, Paula Scher and her Pentagram team created promotional campaigns for The Public Theater’s production of Savion Glover’s Bring in’Da Noise, Bring in ‘Da Funk that featured the wood typefaces used throughout The Public Theater’s identity. Scher was inspired by Rob Ray Kelly’s American Wood Types and the Victorian theater‘s poster when she created the cacophony of disparate wood typefaces, silhouetted photographs and bright flat colors for the theater’s posters and billboard. Scher limited her colors to two or three while highlighted the play’s title and theater logo that surrounded the tap artist in a typographical be-bop. The design was to appeal to a broad audience from the inner cities to the outer boroughs, especially those who hadn’t been attracted to theater.

From 1993 to 2005, Scher worked closely with George C. Wolfe, The Public’s producer and Oskar Eustis, who joined as artistic director during the fiftieth anniversary in 2005, on the development of posters, ads, and distinct identities. As part of the anniversary campaign, the identity was redrawn using the font Akzidenz Grotesk. The word “theater” was dropped and emphasis was placed on the word “public”. By 2008, the identity was even more definitive as it used a knockout font called Hoefler & Frere-Jones which provided affordable and accessible productions.

 

http://www.paulascher.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paula_Scher

http://www.aiga.org/medalist-paulascher

http://www.paulaschermaps.com/

http://www.pentagram.com/en/new/paula-scher/

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James Victore (born in 1962, in the city of Mountain Home, Idaho) is an American art director, designer, and author.

 

He attended the School of Visual Arts in New York, but never graduated. His work has been shown at major art institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York. James Victore is an independent graphic designer whose clients include Moët & Chandon, Target, Amnesty International, the Shakespeare Project, The New York Times, MTV, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum and Portfolio Center. He has been awarded an Emmy for television animation, a Gold Medal from the Broadcast Designers Association, the Grand Prix from the Brno Biennele (Czech Republic) and Gold and Silver Medals from the New York Art Director’s Club. Victore’s posters are in the permanent collections of the Palais du Louvre, the Library of Congress and the Museum für Gestaltung among others. He now teaches graphic design at the School of Visual Arts in New York City and is a member of the AGI.

 

Victore is charming and humble, describing himself as still being “the unknown designer at age 50.” This is, of course, entirely untrue. (Aside from the fact that he’s not yet turned 50.) While you may not know the man, you very likely know the work. Once you see a Victore image – many of which live in the collection at MoMA – you rarely forget it. 

Victore attributes his compulsion to question authority to his childhood on a military base during the Vietnam War. After dropping out of art school, Victore began producing self-financed posters for nonprofit organizations devoted to Native Americans, AIDS awareness, and race issues.

 

http://www.houseofexposure.com/artist/james-victore/9

http://www.jamesvictore.com/

http://99u.com/articles/6944/james-victore-dont-be-a-design-zombie

http://www.moma.org/collection/artist.php?artist_id=35811

http://phobos.ramapo.edu/~dwalker3/webdesign/MajorProject1/bio.htmlImageImageImageImageImage

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