Serendipity Chocolate Melts/Drops

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Return Brief – ‘Serendipity’ Chocolate Melts or Drops

Target Market – Mature Age, Female, Glass of Wine & Chocolate, No Special Occasion Required.

Imagery – Photographic Based, Chocolate Drops, Chocolate Writing, Lines of Chocolate, Minimal 1950’s Retro Style, Atomic Lines?

Colour – Chocolate with orange or mint flavour.

Typography – DaFont, The Loyalist, Chocolate Chips, Chocolate Dealer.

Photoshop Brushes?

Packaging – Thin Rectangle Box, Fine Lines.

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Behind the squeaky clean….

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As is prevalent with most trends, what goes around comes around.

This same rule even applies to mundane products such as soap, with companies repackaging and rejigging their image by taking things back to basics and marketing old school styles to appeal to the modern day customer.

Take a look at the packaging used back in the 1893.

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not too dissimilar to the look of the products we use today…..

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So how did we get here? Through a widely, overexercised use of color, excessive branding and cheesy shapes and designs.

The 90’s in particular saw soap designs merging into novelty shapes such as butterflies and love hearts to rope in the younger market.

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And while this style was hugely popular with the youth market (we all fell victim to the odd body shop birthday gift purchase) this method detracted the older and more lucrative market, by cheapening the product. In turn soaps then took on the olden day, classic aesthetic of the 1920’s and 30’s soap designs which is what has been more heavily used today.

Jessica Hische Typographer

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Jessica Hische is a letterer, illustrator, and crazy cat lady known for her silly side projects and occasional foul mouth.

The 28 year olds background begins with two very understanding and supportive non-artsy parents that stocked the house full of every pencil, marker, and paint set imaginable. Jessica grew up knowing she wanted to do something art related for a living but had no idea what graphic design was until her sophomore year of college.

She then took an intro course and was hooked. Design to her was satisfying in a completely different way than fine art.

“Everything was like a puzzle you had to solve and it wasn’t (for the most part) self-expressionistic.”

Jessica was and still remains a perfectionist. She would find typefaces that were “close but not perfect” and then end up scrapping them all together to make something new. She noticed quickly that incorporating lettering into her projects elevated them above her classmates, everything was cohesive and considered. At this point, she didn’t realize that it would become her specialty or that it was something you could specialize in, but she knew she loved it.

Soon after Jessica graduated she was offered a job with Louise Fili (Graphic Designer) and while working for her she really honed her lettering skills. She was doing a ton of freelance illustration at night and tried to incorporate lettering whenever possible in small ways. Clients started to notice her lettering and were requesting it specifically when hiring Jessica for illustration work. Her portfolio quickly transitioned from “illustration” to “illustrative lettering” and continues to evolve with the more lettering work she does.

“I love what I do for a living and try as hard as I can to help others find a way to do what they love.”

“The work you do while you procrastinate is probably the work you should be doing for the rest of your life.”

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http://pinterest.com/jessicahische/

http://www.humblepied.com/jessica-hische/

http://buystufffrom.jessicahische.com/

http://rookiemag.com/2012/11/why-cant-i-be-you-jessica-hische/

http://www.societyofdesign.org/event_hische.html

Post 3: Typographers, Timba Smits. Jake Dempsey

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Timba Smits is an award winning Melbourne born / London based graphic designer, artist, illustrator, independent publisher, self confessed magazine addict and wannabe olympic ping-pong playa. He is also the worlds tallest ninja (in his dreams) and has a proper love of all things retro and kitsch.

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ImageImageImageImageMost commonly though, Timba is known for founding one of the world’s art communities best kept secrets… Wooden Toy Quarterly: the only quarterly boogazine (half book half magazine) to come out once per year, and proud of it! Wooden Toy is not only a publication worth collecting for its design alone, but for its aim to document and highlight emerging and established creatives that have in some way been influenced by contemporary culture, design and art while drawing in the creatives that Timba thinks can be, and are, an influence or inspiration to others.

www.woodentoypublishingco.com

http://www.timbasmits.com/

http://www.colab.com.au/shop/timba-smits/

http://vector.tutsplus.com/articles/interview-with-timba-smits/

http://www.facebook.com/timba.smits 

Alex Trochut

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Alex Trochut was born in 1981 in Barcelona. Studied Graphic design at Elisava, and started working as freelance designer and illustrator in 2007. Alex Trochut’s illustrations, designs and typography take the modern notion of minimalism and flip it on its side. Trochut’s work philosophy is “More is more.”

Alex Trochut’s illustrations, designs and typography take the [1]modern notion of minimalism and flip it on its side. Trochut’s work philosophy is “More is more.”  It is rich with elegant, brilliantly detailed executions that simultaneously convey indulgence and careful, restrained control. Trochut is driven by a desire to constantly evolve, which can be seen in his eclectic body of work.[2]

Alex has collaborated with clients including Nike, Aster, The Rolling Stones, coca cola, Etapes, Cadbury and Absolut Vodka. Alex’s designs, illustrations and typography defy the simplicity motion with His work philosophy being “more is more”

Renowned for his technically exquisite type creations and designs,[3] His illustrations and designs are very busy and often have intertwining elements, with a lot of them being almost oozing liquid form that reflects movement

He is a featured in many books one of them including Los Logos 4

And has his own book “more is more”

Links:

http://desktopmag.com.au/news/more-is-more-by-alex-trochut/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUlL84UmqT4

http://www.alextrochut.com/ – /alex

http://designenvy.aiga.org/cover-of-the-cr-logo-issue-alex-trochut/

http://www.denzomag.com/2012/12/inspiring-alex-trochut-illustrations/

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Ellie – Scher Logo Design

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Paula Scher and Logo Design

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Paula creates images that speak to contemporary audiences with emotional impact and appeal.  Her career monograph is ‘Make it Bigger’, and that can be seen in her large scale typography projects that are spread across floors, walls and buildings.

Paula has lectured and exhibited all over the world, you can find some of her inspiring, thought provoking and slightly humorous speeches at www.ted.com and www.youtube.com.  Areas of distinction include identity design, packaging design, publication design and environmental graphics.

An example of a recent logo design is Microsoft 8, where Scher asked ‘Your name is Windows, Why are you a flag?’  This then took Scher and Microsoft on a journey to the roots of the organisation, whereby, the brand started as a window, but over the years, as computing systems grew more powerful and graphics more complex, the logo evolved into a flag.  As you will see from the windows logo below, Scher has taken Microsoft back to its window’s roots and somewhat decoded the original organisational message.  An inspiring, confident designer, willing to stand out and do something different – non conventional – DESIGN.

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Sources:

www.ientityworks.com

www.pentagram.com

www.alga.org

www.noisydecentgraphics.typepad.com

http://www.logodesigners.com

www.ted.com

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Whoo! 

28. “ It’s not about knowing all the gimmicks and photo tricks. If you haven’t got the eye, no program will give it to you.” David Carson

59. “Thinking is drawing in your head.  Alan Fletcher